Research paper amplitude modulation

Figure 11 shows a block diagram of an I/Q modulator. The circles with an 'X' represent mixers—devices that perform frequency multiplication and either upconvert or downconvert signals (upconverting here). The I/Q modulator mixes the I waveform with the RF carrier sine wave, and it mixes the Q signal with the same RF carrier sine wave at a 90-degree phase offset. The Q signal is subtracted from the I signal (just as in the equation shown in line 3 in Figure 10) producing the final RF modulated waveform. In fact, the 90-degree shift of the carrier is the source of the names for the I and Q data—I refers to in-phase data (because the carrier is in phase) and Q refers to quadrature data (because the carrier is offset by 90 degrees). This technique is known as quadrature upconversion, and you can use the same I/Q modulator for any modulation scheme. The I/Q modulator is merely reacting to changes in I and Q waveform amplitudes, and I and Q data can represent any changes in magnitude and phase of a message signal. The flexibility and simplicity (relative to other options) of the design of an I/Q modulator is why it is so widely used and popular.

Research paper amplitude modulation

research paper amplitude modulation

Media:

research paper amplitude modulationresearch paper amplitude modulationresearch paper amplitude modulationresearch paper amplitude modulation