Orthodontic thesis

Outside of the office, Dr. Morarend’s interests vary widely. He has been an avid woodworker for over 25 years, and also enjoys welding, metal sculpture and home-improvement projects. He and his wife, Kim, have an extensive vegetable garden and grow as much of their food as they can. He is also an avid beekeeper. Dr. Morarend and Kim have four young sons: Matthew, Luke and John are triplets, and Peter is three years younger. They enjoy camping and hiking in our nation’s national parks and have set the ambitious goal to visit all 58 parks before the boys finish school.

In 2003 started working in a private practice in the Netherlands. During the same time he worked as a lecturer at the Department of Dentistry, University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. He also started doing research at the Department of Orthodontics and published his first article in the American Journal of Orthodontics. In 2007 he started the four-year full-time orthodontic training program at the Department of Orthodontics at the University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. In 2011 he successfully completed the four-year full time orthodontic specialist training. During this postgraduate studies he continued his research and one month after qualifying as an orthodontist, was awarded a Doctors degree in Medical Science (PhD) from the University of Groningen, the Netherlands, with the thesis entitled: Application of CBCT in facial imaging science. During this project he authored or co-authored 17 scientific articles.

Since 2012, Dr. Williams has worked solely in Specialist Orthodontic practice, treating both adult and child patients. She has maintained an interest in teaching orthodontics by becoming an Inspector of Educational Standards for the General Dental Council. Dr Williams has been an active member of the British Orthodontic Society since she started specialist training. She regularly helps to man the Society’s stand at dental trade shows and scientific advice, where she advises budding orthodontists on training and answers questions from dentists about orthodontic clinical issues.

As orthodontists we are always looking to improve efficiency and reduce treatment time. Since the resurrection of self-ligating brackets in the mid-1990’s, there has been an increasing number of appliances and techniques proposing to reduce treatment time. This obviously appeals to us as clinicians and to our patients and is based upon the premise that the method involved accelerates the rate of tooth movement – but what is the evidence? Do the proposed methods make sense based upon our current knowledge of the biological and mechanical processes involved? This presentation will examine the core principles involved in accelerated tooth movement and in particular discuss the high level evidence regarding self-ligating brackets and vibration.

Orthodontic thesis

orthodontic thesis

As orthodontists we are always looking to improve efficiency and reduce treatment time. Since the resurrection of self-ligating brackets in the mid-1990’s, there has been an increasing number of appliances and techniques proposing to reduce treatment time. This obviously appeals to us as clinicians and to our patients and is based upon the premise that the method involved accelerates the rate of tooth movement – but what is the evidence? Do the proposed methods make sense based upon our current knowledge of the biological and mechanical processes involved? This presentation will examine the core principles involved in accelerated tooth movement and in particular discuss the high level evidence regarding self-ligating brackets and vibration.

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