Alexandra kimball essay

When Miller attended the hearing, to which Monroe accompanied him, risking her own career, [22] he gave the committee a detailed account of his political activities. [41] Reneging on the chairman's promise, the committee demanded the names of friends and colleagues who had participated in similar activities. [40] Miller refused to comply, saying "I could not use the name of another person and bring trouble on him." [40] As a result, a judge found Miller guilty of contempt of Congress in May 1957. Miller was sentenced to a fine and a prison sentence, blacklisted, and disallowed a US passport. [42] In 1958, his conviction was overturned by the court of appeals, which ruled that Miller had been misled by the chairman of the HUAC. [43]

In the US, the term has been widely used in the intellectual media, but in Britain, usage has been confined mainly to the popular press. [54] Many such authors and popular-media figures, particularly on the right, have used the term to criticize what they see as bias in the media. [6] [14] William McGowan argues that journalists get stories wrong or ignore stories worthy of coverage, because of what McGowan perceives to be their liberal ideologies and their fear of offending minority groups. [55] Robert Novak, in his essay "Political Correctness Has No Place in the Newsroom", used the term to blame newspapers for adopting language use policies that he thinks tend to excessively avoid the appearance of bias. He argued that political correctness in language not only destroys meaning but also demeans the people who are meant to be protected. [56] Authors David Sloan and Emily Hoff claim that in the US, journalists shrug off concerns about political correctness in the newsroom, equating the political correctness criticisms with the old "liberal media bias" label. [57]

Alexandra kimball essay

alexandra kimball essay


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