Adam and eve essay

Gilgamesh delivers a lamentation for Enkidu, in which he calls upon mountains, forests, fields, rivers, wild animals, and all of Uruk to mourn for his friend. Recalling their adventures together, Gilgamesh tears at his hair and clothes in grief. He commissions a funerary statue, and provides grave gifts from his treasury to ensure that Enkidu has a favourable reception in the realm of the dead. A great banquet is held where the treasures are offered to the gods of the Netherworld. Just before a break in the text there is a suggestion that a river is being dammed, indicating a burial in a river bed, as in the corresponding Sumerian poem, The Death of Gilgamesh.

Do people actually believe this? The bible was written by men, no women involved, the churches were invented by men, and were used, and are still used, to instil fear and superstition in weak men and women. People who are afraid of death need to believe that there is something for them when they die. The truth is that there is nothing when you die. Your life ends, nothing follows, no heaven, hell, limbo purgatory etc, What you have is all you will ever have. The bible is full of stories and the biggest one is that Christ died on the cross, rose again in 3 days and later floated off into heaven. The reality is that he didn’t die on the cross, that he lived for some 45 more years, married and had children. The bible is not the only book written about those times. Christians, don’t be afraid to read, to wonder and above all, to question.

The Book of Genesis, which recounts God’s eviction of Adam and Eve from the Garden of Eden, is at the core of the creation story shared by the so-called Abrahamic religions: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The biblical first couple was a popular artistic subject from the medieval era through the Renaissance and even into modern times, although in an increasingly secular modern age, they also have been subjected to more satirical treatment. One of the last books published by Mark Twain was titled Eve’s Diary (1906). His second book on the subject, The Private Life of Adam and Eve , was published posthumously in 1931.

In regard to who they view one another, Adam "perhaps thinks he desires `rational delights,' but what he gets is his paternally conditioned Desire-a clinging beauty who at first, instead of conversing with an angel, would rather learn theology in Adam's arms. Moreover, Adam's `likeness' is also fatally susceptible to a temptation which in large measure Satan couches in terms of appearances and otherness-elements that were primary in God's verbal response to Adam's request" (Mikics.) Adam also, according to Greg Smith, sees his position in a hierarchical perspective, with his power extending not only over the animals in which he commands, but with his female companion: "After all, he reasons, he resembles God more than she, and because God represents the more powerful faction of male reasoning, shouldn't this power be manifest in himself as well?" (Smith.) Eve's view of Adam, at first, is one full of mutual agreement and companionship; however, near their Fall, "Eve is no longer willing to continue to support the illusion of her subjection to Adam-for all patriarchal purposes, she too has gotten out of control. She asserts her individuality and authority in declaring that they should split up to tend the garden," (Smith.) She views herself as being more than just something to command: she sees herself as someone with a reasoning and will of her own, a quality that sets her apart from her naïve husband, who always thought that he was the superior creation.

Adam and eve essay

adam and eve essay

In regard to who they view one another, Adam "perhaps thinks he desires `rational delights,' but what he gets is his paternally conditioned Desire-a clinging beauty who at first, instead of conversing with an angel, would rather learn theology in Adam's arms. Moreover, Adam's `likeness' is also fatally susceptible to a temptation which in large measure Satan couches in terms of appearances and otherness-elements that were primary in God's verbal response to Adam's request" (Mikics.) Adam also, according to Greg Smith, sees his position in a hierarchical perspective, with his power extending not only over the animals in which he commands, but with his female companion: "After all, he reasons, he resembles God more than she, and because God represents the more powerful faction of male reasoning, shouldn't this power be manifest in himself as well?" (Smith.) Eve's view of Adam, at first, is one full of mutual agreement and companionship; however, near their Fall, "Eve is no longer willing to continue to support the illusion of her subjection to Adam-for all patriarchal purposes, she too has gotten out of control. She asserts her individuality and authority in declaring that they should split up to tend the garden," (Smith.) She views herself as being more than just something to command: she sees herself as someone with a reasoning and will of her own, a quality that sets her apart from her naïve husband, who always thought that he was the superior creation.

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